Alexander’s Blog

September 13, 2008

How to recover backups created with Ntbackup.exe on WS08

by @ 2:59 pm. Filed under Applications, Tips & Tricks, Tools/Utils, Windows 2008

If you have been using Ntbackup.exe that came with earlier versions of Windows and now you plan to use the new Windows Server Backup that comes with Windows Server 2008 (WS08), there are several things that you need to keep in mind.

  1. The backups require NTFS-formatted volumes.
  2. You can backup to hard disks (both internal and external) but the disks must be locally attached.
  3. You can backup to DVDs and remote shared folders using UNC in Windows Server 2008.
  4. If you plan to use scheduled backups then you will need a separate, dedicated disk.
  5. If you back up to an external disk then the disk will be dedicated to backups and you won’t be able to see it Windows Explorer. The idea is that you can remove the external disk for off-site storage.
  6. Backing up to tape is not supported in Windows Server 2008 but there is support for tape storage drivers.
  7. You cannot back up volumes larger than 2043 GB with Windows Server Backup tool.
  8. Windows Server 2008 does not support recovering from backups that were created with the old Ntbackup.exe. However, Microsoft is offering a new version of Ntbackup.exe for people who want to recover data from the old backups that were created using Ntbackup.exe. Keep in mind that this “special” version of Ntbackup.exe is only for recovering backups that you created with previous versions of Windows and you cannot use them to create new backups in Windows ServerĀ 2008. For more information on this special version of Ntbackup.exe called Windows NT Backup – Restore Utility click here.

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